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Medizinische Universität Innsbruck

PhD Program in Neuroscience

The PhD Program in Neuroscience is designed as a course of study consisting of both basic and clinical neuroscience. Students are exposed to recent theories about brain function and up-to-date research strategies. They acquire the technical skills of planning, conducting and evaluating complex experiments and clinical studies. Participation in the program forms a cornerstone in the training of young researchs interested in pursuing a career in academic, clinical and biotechnological environments.


Medizinische Universität Innsbruck

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SPIN - Signal Processing in Neurons

 SPIN doctoral school is an initiative of Innsbruck Medical University and Innsbruck Leopold-Franzens University.  It was established in September 2007 with the support of the FWF Austrian Science Fund.


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Medizinische Universität Innsbruck

Chronic diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as fear/anxiety disorders and neurodegenerative diseases occur with high and increasing prevalence. Since molecular disease mechanisms are not fully understood, current drug therapies are often unsatisfactory. The development of novel and improved therapeutic strategies requires the identification of innovative targets for therapeutic intervention. The major goal of this SFB is to comprehensively study two signaling pathways that bear such potential: L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and epigenetic modulators, in particular histone deacetylases (HDACs). Both pathways appear to participate in the etiology of several neurological disorders. Moreover, recent preliminary findings from our consortium suggest that they can be (patho-) physiologically linked.

We bundle our strong local expertise to study calcium mediated, epigenetic and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) - mediated regulatory mechanisms to disclose the role of these pathways for the pathophysiology of Parkinsonian disorders (Parkinson's disease, Multiple System Atrophy), Alzheimer's disease and abnormal fear and anxiety.

© 2017/2018 Austrian Neuroscience Association (ANA) / Österreichische Gesellschaft für Neurowissenschaften (ÖGN)